The Scales Fall Off

Alex Dick-Read

This is worth reading as we head into the Slime Age. The full article appears here. There’s also a video below from ‘The End of the Line’, an in depth look at where fishing is at. (There’s a clue in the title).

The Scales Fall Off
Is there any hope for our overfished oceans?
by Elizabeth Kolbert
The world’s “peak fish” point came in the late nineteen-eighties, but no one noticed.
The Atlantic bluefin tuna is shaped like a child’s idea of a fish, with a pointy snout, two dorsal fins, and a rounded belly that gradually tapers toward the back. It is gunmetal blue on top, and silvery on the underside, and its tail looks like a sickle. The Atlantic bluefin is one of the fastest swimmers in the sea, reaching speeds of fifty-five miles an hour. This is an achievement that scientists have sought to understand but have never quite mastered; a robo-tuna, built by a team of engineers at M.I.T., was unable to outswim a real one. (The word “tuna” is derived from the Greek thuno, meaning “to rush.”) Atlantic bluefins are voracious carnivores—they feed on squid, crustaceans, and other fish—and can grow to be fifteen feet long.
At one time, Atlantic bluefins were common from the coast of Maine to the Black Sea, and from Norway to Brazil. In the Mediterranean, they have been prized for millennia—in an ode from the second century, the poet Oppian describes the Romans catching bluefins in “nets arranged like a city”—but they are unusually bloody fish, and in most of the rest of the world there was little market for them. (Among English speakers, they were long known as “horse mackerel.”) As recently as the late nineteen-sixties, bluefin in the United States sold for only a few pennies a pound, if there were any buyers, and frequently ended up being ground into cat food.

Read more http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/books/2010/08/02/100802crbo_books_kolbert?currentPage=1#ixzz0vPVQEkyg

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